Could they do it, we could hear you thinking? Could the geniuses behind Popup Cantonese come up with yet another lesson on adjectives? And could it be just as essential for our continued survival as a species as our previous lessons? We think the answer is yes. So join Brendan and Nicole today for this podcast as we put an end to constant hunger and fatigue by learning three more super useful adjectives: tired, hungry and thirsty.

In this series of Cantonese lessons for total beginners to Cantonese, we focus on the most high-frequency adjectives in the language. If you're just starting to learn Cantonese, start with our critical phrases lessons and move on to this series when you're done. Each subsequent lesson is designed to review key words and phrases to reinforce what you've learned. And if you have any questions or tech problems, let us know anytime by leaving a comment in the discussion section below, or writing us at service@popupcantonese.com.
 said on
January 26, 2011
Great lesson!

Funny how "hou2ngo1" almost sound like "hunger" even more like "Hunger" in German ;)

 said on
January 27, 2011
Another phrase you can add here is 我唔肚餓 or 我唔餓 - I'm not hungry. ^_^
 said on
January 27, 2011
@Benrose

I guess our ancestors throughout the world had the urge to pronounce something like "ngo" or "hunger" or "urhhhh" when they are hungry and so came up with all these similar sounding words. Just like words for "mama" and "papa" are universal.

It's probably a typo but it should be tone 6 on the word 饿 :)

@woaibento

hahah, 多谢你提醒!Thanks!
 said on
May 1, 2011
I can understand tummy hungry, but "neck thirsty"?
 said on
May 3, 2011
@cradnovich

Yeah, the literal translation is a bit funny. I guess people are referring to the throat rather than the neck in this phrase.
 said on
May 3, 2011
I think 頸 means throat, not neck, in the word 頸渴. Which maybe makes a little more sense :-)

Cantonese likes localising adjectives to various body parts. In English we just have thristy, hungry, sleepy, dizzy, etc. but in Cantonese you have

肚餓 stomach hungry

口渴 mouth thirsty (or 頸渴 throat thirsty)

眼瞓 eyes sleepy

頭暈 head dizzy

And I am sure there are more :-)

 said on
May 4, 2011
I agree. 頸 generally means neck, like 佢条頸好長, 'she's got a long neck'. 長頸鹿 'giraffe' or literally 'long neck deer'. Here in the word 頸渴 it refers to the throat.

Thanks for the examples. I've got one, too: 身興(san1 hing3), 'body warm', as in 頭暈身興, symptoms of a fever or a flu. Also, 鼻塞(bei6 saak1), 'nose blocked'.