Now that you know how to say hello and goodbye in Cantonese, it's time to stretch your wings and learn to grovel. That's right, today we enter the realm of the always-critical phrases please, thank you and sorry. Life is not all bad though. In addition to learning these words, we'll teach you how to use them to hit on friends and strangers.

Want to learn Cantonese? This is lesson two in our series designed to teach Cantonese to absolute beginners. We're focusing on learning the basics and familiarizing ourselves with the tones here. So as you listen, be sure to click through to our text and vocabulary pages to read our popup annotated transcripts and drill in key vocabulary with our critical vocabulary lists. And if you have any questions? Leave a comment in our discussion section below, or write us anytime at service@popupcantonese.com.
 said on
December 20, 2010
Hey guys,

We're still trying to keep the focus on critical words and mastering the tones, but this recording is a bit more light-hearted than the last one. We managed to make Nicole laugh at least. So let us know what you think. :)

Cheers,

--dave
 said on
December 22, 2010
Very happy to hear that Nicole is part of this venture, since she is excellent in the other program. Just don't force her to see bad movies on her birthday. Poor Echo.
 said on
December 22, 2010
Hi choula09,

Such a pleasure to read your comment! Actually I'm recommending/forcing them to see all sorts of Cantonese movies. Ha ha.
 said on
December 23, 2010
Yes. Sadly, the emotional abuse goes the other way here at Popup Cantonese. I will only point out that Future X-Cops was ORIGINALLY from Hong Kong. So I don't know why Nicole isn't taking the fall on this!

 said on
December 23, 2010
Hi,

Just to point out that 多謝 is used after when you are given a gift and

唔該 is used after a service (i.e. in a shop). I used to get told off for saying the wrong "thank you" when I was young.

Also in Cantonese I think there are 4 different "pinyin" (I prefer Yale). e.g. "do-ze" (多謝) can be written as "do-je", which I find phonetically correct. Z can be substituted with a J.
 said on
December 23, 2010
Hi woaibento,

Thank you for pionting that out! It's very helpful. Also 多謝 is used after when you receive a compliment but 唔該 isn't.

Yeah the Jyutping system has its limitations for English speakers with the "z","j" and "y" etc., but it's quite widely used, and as a native speaker, I find it more precise in terms of depicting the language, for instance, the "zim" (尖) in Jyutping is phonetically more correct than the "jim" in Yale, since "z" in Cantonese is not like an English "j" sound. But it's also true that the "j" in Yale represents the "z" (and also the sound shift of "zh")in Jyutping. Either way it's confusing and takes time to get used to. In this regard perhaps the Jyutping "z" is a better reminder that Cantonese has a different "j". And also Jyutping differenciates certain sounds that Yale doesn't, like, "eu" in Yale represents both "eo" and "oe" in Jyutping.

But of course it's personal preference which system to use:)

Thank you again for leaving us comment. 多謝晒!
 said on
December 26, 2010
what does the 晒 mean in 多谢晒? How is it different from 多谢?

Thanks!
 said on
December 27, 2010
Hi laubis,

晒 means "entirely", "completely" or "very much". For example, 食晒(sik6 saai3) means "to eat up, to eat everything".

多谢晒 is literally "thanks a lot". But 晒 here acts like a auxiliary word of the tone. 多谢晒 is softer and more colloquial than 多谢. It's the same with 唔该 and 唔该晒.

Hope it helps.
 said on
December 27, 2010
thanks Nicole,

or: 多謝晒!
 said on
December 28, 2010
@Nicole

Thank you!

With 尖, I also prefer using the J.

Not to confuse the matter but in Hong Kong they use "ts" as well for 尖 (尖沙咀). And also "tse" for 謝 in surnames (謝霆鋒).

By the way will there be podcasts on Cantonese tones in the near future?
 said on
December 29, 2010
Hi laubis,

唔使客氣!

Hi woaibento,

唔使客氣!

You're right. In Hong Kong a unique spelling system is used by the government to transcribe the geographical names and Chinese names. It's based on English and doesn't always reflect the true pronunciation of the Cantonese word, nor the tones, and sometimes one word can have more than one spelling, e.g. the surname 葉 can be "yip" or "ip"; 仔(zai2) and 柴(caai4) are both transcribed as CHAI.

Yes we're working on a tone lesson and hope to get it out soon!
 said on
January 31, 2012
the audio for question 1 of the quiz and the answer don't match up.
 said on
February 2, 2012
@sanjay.garla,

Thanks for the heads up. We've looked into it and the problem should be fixed. Best,

--david
 said on
June 8, 2015
Lol this helped :P